NJNP COLLECTIVE HOUSING

ABOUT

NJNP Collective Housing (NCH) has been a vital resource to DC's Trans & Queer Community and the larger Sex Worker Activist network within the DC Area. Started by No Justice No Pride in 2018 — in the wake of the passage of FOSTA/SESTA — to ensure safe housing for Black and Brown Trans People, particularly, for those currently or formerly engaged in sex work. NJNP is currently renting 5 safe houses with plans in the near future for a 6th. These safe houses, along with the broader DMV movement make up the NJNP Collective Housing’s network; allow us to provide housing to as many as 75 people a night.

About NJNP Collective Housing

THE FACTS

What our communities are facing -

Housing

37%

of DC's trans sex workers are homeless.

  • The US Transgender Survey found that 24% of respondents experienced some form of housing discrimination in the past year, such as being evicted from their home or denied a home or apartment because of being transgender, 21% have experienced homelessness at some point in their lives, and, 11% experienced homelessness in the past year because of being transgender. www.ustranssurvey.org/

  • 1 out of 5 Trans Women experience homelessness

  • Trans people who have experienced homelessness are 2.5 times more likely to have been incarcerated than those with stable housing.hips.org/sex-worker-advocates-coalition-swac.html


Sex work

1 out of 5

D.C. sex workers have been approached by police asking them for sex.

  • 37% of DC's trans sex workers are homeless. hips.org/sex-worker-advocates-coalition-swac.html

  • 80% of street based sex workers experience violence. davidgrosso.org/grosso-analysis/decrimnowdc

  • 79% of sex workers surveyed, reported housing as their most immediate need. davidgrosso.org/grosso-analysis/decrimnowdc

  • In DC — according to the DC Trans Needs Assessment Survey, a survey released in 2015 that had over 500 trans participants in the DC Area — over 35% of the respondents reported of having engaged in sex work, with a majority those respondents being of color and identifying as trans woman or trans feminine. dctranscoalition.files.wordpress.com/2015/11/dctc-access-denied-final.pdf


Funding for Trans led inititives + resources for Trans communities

1¢ / $100

In last dedcade, Trans communities receives one penny for every $100 foundations awarded

  • In the last decade, foundation funding for trans issues increased more than eightfold – growing to a record high of $8.3 million in 2013. However, trans communities only received 0.015 percent of all foundation funding, or a penny for every $100 foundations awarded https://lgbtfunders.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/TRANSformational_Impact.pdf

  • The D.C. City Council provides $834,404 annually for 29 units of housing for vulnerable LGBT Residents. Additionally, city services in D.C.,along with many other major cities, become even more limited after the age of 24. This gap greatly exacerbates the violence Black and Brown Trans women are vulnerable to in a city with rising costs of living.

  • Throwing gasoline on a wildfire, many of the services that are available and funded by the city require service providers to check boxes that don’t exist within our community. These services provide housing vouchers but the process often requires long waits to access limited open spots. Additionally, long-term public housing options are underfunded or under threat of privatization all around DC including Park Morton, Barry Farm, The Manor, Congress Heights and the Wharf. Many in our community face rampant voucher discrimination in the D.C. private rental markets.


Resources and Services provided by DC GOV -

  • The D.C. City Council provides $834,404 annually for 29 units of housing for vulnerable LGBT Residents.

  • Other city services in D.C.,along with many other major cities, become even more limited after the age of 24 or relies on the carceral system. This gap greatly exacerbates the violence Black and Brown Trans women are vulnerable to in a city with rising costs of living.

  • Many of the services that are available and funded by the city require service providers to check boxes that don’t exist within our community. These services may provide housing vouchers but the process often requires long waits to access limited open spots.

  • Additionally, long-term public housing options are underfunded or under threat of privatization all around DC including Park Morton, Barry Farm, The Manor, Congress Heights and the Wharf. Many in our community face rampant voucher discrimination in the D.C. private rental markets.

Specific to the NJNP Collective Housing -

  • In 2020, NJNP Collective Housing; raised $140,000 for Trans and Queer housing and currently has nearly 40 long term or permanent residents. Between longer term and temporary housing, NJNP Collective Housing is able to house as many as 75 people a night (double the capacity provided by the city).

  • Since starting NJNP Collective Housing in 2018, we have doubled capacity each year.

  • NJNP Collective Housing is entirely funded by community support and without government or municipal support.

  • While NJNP has had some success accessing grants, limited funding exists amongst private foundations for these programs.

  • Historically, philanthropic institutions assume cities will provide these housing resources.

  • NJNP Collective Housing is one of few places in Washington D.C., providing intensive housing support to displaced Trans people, and in particular to those over the age of 24.

Latest NJNP Collective Housing Updates

F.A.Q.

How can housing benefit housing insecure sex workers?
Many housing insecure sex workers are more reliant on street based work which often is more unsafe. Street Based work allows you little ability to fully screen your clients, leaves you open as a target to attacks, and often forces sex workers to accept lower rates. This in combination with harassment and intimidation from police and an unsteady client stream makes it very difficult to maintain the income to sustain rent payments. Housing gives many sex workers security and safety they need and allows sex workers to negotiate better rates and screen clients in the privacy of their own homes.
What are some challenges to finding housing that accommodates the needs of a sex worker?
Many service providers stop providing services to trans folks who are over than 24, and since Black and Brown Trans sex workers often are so isolated some don't hear about these services until they are in their early 20s and they age out while waiting on a never ending voucher list. Many who are able to get these services are faced with limits such as curfews, no guest policies, cameras, and nightly bed checks. Often times Trans sex workers travel in groups and sometimes folks don't want to stay at a new place by themselves (and for good reason, we need to keep eachother safe). When we've worked with our networks on short term housing we've often tried to find spaces that would accommodate more than one person for this reason.
How can decriminalizing sex work help workers facing housing insecurity?
It would allow them to work without fear of criminalization. It would decrease stigmatization. Both criminalization and stigmatization greatly limit sex workers from seeking out resources when they are in need. It would allow sex workers more autonomy on their employment. By criminalizing sex work, the District actually makes it more difficult for sex workers and former sex workers to find alternative employment, report acts of violence, and practice safer sex.
Read F.A.Q.

NJNP NEEDS

At the NJNP Collective there is never shortage of needs to be filled. If you have any materials or supplies you can donate to the collective, it would go a long way.

Do you have an extra mattress or any bedding lying around that you would like to donate? Food, office Supplies, Beds and bedding, Meals, clothes, electronics etc. At the NJNP Collective there is never shortage of needs to be filled. If you have any materials or supplies you can donate to the collective, it would go a long way. We have a ongoing need for groceries, bedding material, office supplies – such as paper, folders, notebooks, etc – for our organizers, electronics such as printers, used and/or broken computers and cell phones. Please contact our resource manager at bianca@nojusticenopride.org to coordinate drop off. Please check below for needs directly requested by our residents and check out this page for more ways you can support us with needs, groceries, meal support and more.

***At this time, we do not have regular access to vehicals or a truck to transport large donations. We ask, whenever it's possible and accessible for you to do so to arrange transportation of donated items.


Latest Needs requested directly by residents *Frequently Updated

Check out our 'NJNP Needs' Page

NEED SUPPORT?

Are you a Black Or Brown Trans Person based in DC in need of housing? Please fill our this form to get added to our current waitlest. You will receive a response within 30 days. Please note with our current capacity it may take some time. Once we have capacity, you will be contacted for an interview followed by your NJNP Agreement form.

We know that in order to center those most on the margins requires us to support each other and our communities♥, to keep one another safe, fed, and housed as we fight for a world that affirms us all, and we know that we can't do that without you!

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